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Homelessness in D2
Homeless concerns hotline and helpline 

For concerns related to homelessness and encampments in your community, please call 408-975-1440 or email . Housing Department staff will respond to inquiries within three business days to 1) acknowledge receipt of the concern, and 2) collect any additional details needed. An outreach team will then be deployed to assess the situation, offer services to homeless individuals in the area, and determine any next steps to resolve the reported concern. 

If you are homeless and seeking help, please contact the Homeless Helpline at 408-510-7600 or . The Helpline is operated by HomeFirst. 

Visit the City of San Jose's Housing Department website for additional helpful resources: Ending Homelessness

For homeless in need: Resources & Referrals

From Santa Clara County: 2017 Homeless Census & Survey Comprehensive Report

City of San José and County of Santa Clara Efforts to Address Homelessness

Council Study Session - November 20, 2017
View the presentation 
Watch the full meeting 

Overnight Warming Location Program


Overnight Warming Locations FAQ Sheet

Councilmember Sergio Jimenez's statement regarding the approval of OWLs at the Tuesday, 11/27/2017 City Council Meeting


The City Council and I unanimously approved a contract with HomeFirst to operate four Overnight Warming Locations (OWL’s) through the 2017-2018 cold weather season. The OWL’s will run from December 5, 2017 through June 30, 2018 at Tully Community Library, Southside Community and Senior Center, Alum Rock Library, and Roosevelt Community Center.

I am pleased that many of the community's concerns were incorporated into the program agreement. The Contract with HomeFirst will provide the following:

• Access to restroom facilities and food;
• Site set up, supervision and sanitation;
• Security services will be provided through a subcontract with a professional, established, security agency to provide service during all hours of operation at each location;
• Cleaning services to be provided through a subcontract with a professional cleaning service to clean each location in the morning after the locations are activated so that the locations can be returned to regular programming the next morning without interruption or delay to residents;
• If site staff identifies any issue, it will be addressed within the same business day by HomeFirst or the City Representative;
• HomeFirst will provide bus tokens and shuttle service to offer transportation as users exit the facility to ensure no loitering occurs at the site;
• As a result of community input, the amended agreement will provide funding for expanded security and additional HomeFirst staff at each site. At the request of the community, HomeFirst will ensure that security remains on-site for a short period after each OWL site is closed;
• The agreement also requires HomeFirst to survey participants to ensure quality of the services and customer satisfaction.

The OWL centers will be activated only when the following inclement weather thresholds are met:

• An overnight low of 38 degrees or lower with a probability of rain less than 50%; or
• An overnight low of 42 degrees or lower with a probability of rain of 50% or greater; or
• Prolonged periods of rain with flooding in low-lying areas; or
• 50% probability of rain for two or more days

At the Southside Community and Senior Center, the OWL program will run in rooms 8 and 9 and not in the multipurpose Edenvale room to not conflict with the senior programming.

Many of you recommended we utilize the San Jose Police South-Substation as an OWL. I was encouraged by this recommendation. However, after careful review with Police Chief Garcia, it was determined that the Sub-station is not an appropriate location for this use. The Sub-station is occupied and utilized 24 hours a day, 7 days a week by recruits, community service officers, and police officers. Additionally, there is no way to confine individuals to the community room within the substation because all spaces are interconnected. Currently the Southside Community Center is the most appropriate location within District 2.

I will monitor the OWL program very closely this winter and evaluate its effectiveness and community impact. OWL’s are intended to rotate throughout the City where there is need for services, this is not a permanent location. 
Though the OWL program is not the solution to our housing crisis it does bring temporary relief to the imminent and ever growing danger of deaths on our streets.

If you have any questions please contact Vanessa Sandoval, at (408) 535-4925 or at .
For more information, please view:

The Housing Department's memorandum dated November 6, 2017 

The City's Overnight Warming Locations webpage

Santa Clara County Public Health Department Hepatitis A Information 

Bridge Housing Communities

Visit the City of San Jose's Bridge Housing Communities webpage

Visit the City of San Jose's Bridge Housing Communities FAQ's

Read Reports and Memos related to Bridge Housing Communities

02/12/2018 Housing Department Memorandum: Top Three Candidate Sites for Bridge Housing Communities

From the D2 Office

February 12, 2018: Bridge Housing Communities Update & D2 Community Meeting

December 14, 2017: A message regarding Bridge Housing Communities / "Tiny Homes" sites

December 12, 2017: Bridge Housing Communities Update

December 12, 2017 Councilmember Sergio Jimenez's MemorandumActions Related to the Bridge Housing Community

August 30, 2017: Bridge Housing Communities Update

August 25, 2017 Councilmember Sergio Jimenez's Memorandum: Actions related to the AB2176: Bridge Housing Communities (BHC)

August 3, 2017: 
Bridge Housing Communities: An Open Letter to District 2 Residents

Important information about activity near the intersections of Monterey Hwy & Bernal Rd. and Monterey Hwy & Branham Ln.

From the City of San Jose Department of Transportation: Information about projects near the intersections of Monterey Hwy & Bernal Rd. and Monterey Hwy & Branham Ln.

For more information about the work at Monterey Hwy & Bernal Rd, please read this notice from the City of San Jose Department of Public Works

Requests for underutilized land from San Jose City Council to other public agencies

Letter to Caltrans Bridge Housing

Letter to County Bridge Housing


Letter to SJECCD Bridge Housing

Letter to VTA Bridge Housing

A message from the City of San Jose's Housing Department

With the federal government moving more and more towards permanent supportive housing, rapid rehousing, and homelessness prevention as the three major strategies, most studies (see below) have focused on permanent supportive housing or affordable housing, showing either positive benefits or no impact on surrounding properties' values.

http://nonprofithousing.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/Toolkits/Original%20Toolkit/PropVal-2-26.pdf

https://shnny.org/uploads/Furman_Center_Policy_Brief.pdf

http://www.csh.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/BeyondNIMBYpdf.pdf

http://www.austintexas.gov/edims/document.cfm?id=154424  

Unfortunately, few studies have examined the impact of shelters or transitional housing on surrounding property values, as these approaches are no longer viewed as best practice strategies at the national level. While there is some overlap between certain types of supportive housing and shelters, findings on the former may not apply to the latter. You will commonly hear individuals cite evidence that a transitional or shelter program will decrease property values, but the data does not come from any type of empirically researched study. There is one Philadelphia study from 2007 that does, however, look at 15 transitional housing facilities, finding no adverse impacts on surrounding property values: https://shnny.org/uploads/Project_HOME.pdf.

While not related directly to property value, the City of Seattle did just commission a one-year study of three sanctioned encampment and tiny home communities: http://www.seattle.gov/Documents/Departments/HumanServices/AboutUs/Final%202017%20Permitted%20Encampment%20Evaluation.pdf. Among other things, the report notes no major negative community impacts related to the sites over the course of the one-year study.  

http://www.businessinsider.com/detroit-homeless-tiny-home-neighborhood-2017-6

To contact our office regarding Bridge Housing Communities, please email or call (408) 535-4902