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Homelessness in D2
Homeless concerns hotline and helpline 

For concerns related to homelessness and encampments in your community, please call 408-975-1440 or email . Housing Department staff will respond to inquiries within three business days to 1) acknowledge receipt of the concern, and 2) collect any additional details needed. An outreach team will then be deployed to assess the situation, offer services to homeless individuals in the area, and determine any next steps to resolve the reported concern. 

If you are homeless and seeking help, please contact the Homeless Helpline at 408-510-7600 or . The Helpline is operated by HomeFirst. 

Visit the City of San Jose's Housing Department website for additional helpful resources: Ending Homelessness

For homeless in need: Resources & Referrals

From Santa Clara County: 2017 Homeless Census & Survey Comprehensive Report

Bridge Housing Communities

Visit the City of San Jose's Bridge Housing Communities webpage

From the D2 Office


August 30, 2017: Bridge Housing Communities Update

August 25, 2017 Councilmember Sergio Jimenez's Memorandum: Actions related to the AB2176: Bridge Housing Communities (BHC)

August 3, 2017: 
Bridge Housing Communities: An Open Letter to District 2 Residents

Important information about activity near the intersections of Monterey Hwy & Bernal Rd. and Monterey Hwy & Branham Ln.

From the City of San Jose Department of Transportation: Information about projects near the intersections of Monterey Hwy & Bernal Rd. and Monterey Hwy & Branham Ln.

For more information about the work at Monterey Hwy & Bernal Rd, please read this notice from the City of San Jose Department of Public Works

Requests for underutilized land from San Jose City Council to other public agencies

Letter to Caltrans Bridge Housing

Letter to County Bridge Housing


Letter to SJECCD Bridge Housing

Letter to VTA Bridge Housing

A message from the City of San Jose's Housing Department

With the federal government moving more and more towards permanent supportive housing, rapid rehousing, and homelessness prevention as the three major strategies, most studies (see below) have focused on permanent supportive housing or affordable housing, showing either positive benefits or no impact on surrounding properties' values.

http://nonprofithousing.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/Toolkits/Original%20Toolkit/PropVal-2-26.pdf

https://shnny.org/uploads/Furman_Center_Policy_Brief.pdf

http://www.csh.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/BeyondNIMBYpdf.pdf

http://www.austintexas.gov/edims/document.cfm?id=154424  

Unfortunately, few studies have examined the impact of shelters or transitional housing on surrounding property values, as these approaches are no longer viewed as best practice strategies at the national level. While there is some overlap between certain types of supportive housing and shelters, findings on the former may not apply to the latter. You will commonly hear individuals cite evidence that a transitional or shelter program will decrease property values, but the data does not come from any type of empirically researched study. There is one Philadelphia study from 2007 that does, however, look at 15 transitional housing facilities, finding no adverse impacts on surrounding property values: https://shnny.org/uploads/Project_HOME.pdf.

While not related directly to property value, the City of Seattle did just commission a one-year study of three sanctioned encampment and tiny home communities: http://www.seattle.gov/Documents/Departments/HumanServices/AboutUs/Final%202017%20Permitted%20Encampment%20Evaluation.pdf. Among other things, the report notes no major negative community impacts related to the sites over the course of the one-year study.  

http://www.businessinsider.com/detroit-homeless-tiny-home-neighborhood-2017-6

To contact our office regarding Bridge Housing Communities, please email or call (408) 535-4902